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2015 Advocacy Award Winners

ACCE 2015 Challenge Award

​This award honors individuals who are not presently an ACCE member, but are eligible for membership, for their achievements within the field of clinical engineering (CE) / health technology management (HTM).



Marjorie Funk, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN

Marjorie Funk, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN

The Award winner is Marjorie Funk, PhD, RN, FAHA, FAAN. Professor Funk has been on the faculty at the Yale School of Nursing since 1984. She received undergraduate degrees from Wheaton College (MA) and Cornell University - New York Hospital School of Nursing, an MSN in Medical-Surgical Nursing and PhD in Chronic Disease Epidemiology from Yale University.

Her teaching responsibilities include statistics, research, electrocardiography, and clinical supervision in cardiac critical care.  Her research has focused on the wise use of technology in the care of critically ill patients, via the appropriate and safe use of technology, its equitable distribution, and the human-machine interface.  Marge is the author of 100+ peer reviewed articles, and is the Principal Investigator of a 17-site randomized trial on implementing ECG monitoring practice standards funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.
 
Marge was the coordinator of the AAMI HTSI webinar series on clinical alarms, and is on their Alarms Steering Committee and National Coalition for Alarm Management Safety. She is also on the AAMI Medical Device Alarms Standards Committee. Marge is an active member of the Healthcare Technology Foundation (HTF), and led the publication of articles related to the HTF national alarms survey in the American Journal of Critical Care. She has also participated in the Patient Education initiative of HTF.  Marge is an active supporter of clinical engineering (CE) at Yale and beyond, with her interdisciplinary approach to patient safety.

ACCE 2015 Tom O'Dea Advocacy Award

​The award will be given to an individual who has written articles, given presentations, or led efforts that have advanced the field of CE – particularly in promoting the profession to people in other related fields


Manny Furst, PhD, CCE

Manny Furst, PhD, CCE

​The winner is Manny Furst, PhD, CCE, for his efforts to promote the CE role in HTM and Health IT field.  Uniquely, Manny is the 1st two-time winner of this award; previously in 2000.
 
A colleague notes: "Since 2005, he has quietly but competently and brilliantly hoisted the CE flag within HIMSS, IHE, and NIST.  Thanks to Manny, AAMI has embraced a Medical Device Interoperability Showcase at their Annual Conference too, showcasing the hospital of tomorrow and rekindling interest and enthusiasm.  Oh, and yes, there's the AAMI "Manny Meeting" that has sparked CE / HTM leadership growth for over three decades!  Funny thing: Manny is so modest that we all forget he is still out in front, leading the parade."
 
Emanuel Furst has been President, Improvement Technologies, LLC, Tucson, Arizona, since 2004, providing consulting in medical equipment interoperability, management, benchmarking, selection/planning, application, and training.  Until July 2014, he was the IHE / Patient Care Domain (PCD) Technical Project Manager since 2005 and now limits his support to the Interoperability Showcases.  Earlier he was a CE Manager for Premier, and CE Director at University of Arizona Medical Center for over 20 years.
 
Manny has received many awards for professional activities and publications; a recent one was the 2013 ACCE/HIMSS Excellence in CE and IT Synergy Award. He has been active in ACCE, AAMI, ASHE, and IEEE, serving on the Board of Directors and committee chairperson at AAMI, and as an associate editor for IEEE.  He has written or delivered over 70 papers and presentations. He has notably authored Outsourcing Or Insourcing: Securing A Successful CE Program; co-authored e-Essentials: EC Knowledge and Assessment and CE Improvement Tools, a forerunner to benchmarking, and was a contributing editor of Facilities Engineering Improvement Tools.

ACCE/HTF 2015 Marv Shepherd Patient Safety Award

​The award will be given to an individual who has excelled in the "safety" area related to the CE field. This is a joint Award between ACCE and the Healthcare Technology Foundation


Dale Nordenberg, MD

Dale Nordenberg, MD

​The Award winner is Dale Nordenberg, MD, Co‐founder and Executive Director, Medical Device Innovation, Safety, and Security Consortium (MDISS), a public-private partnership that since 2010 has worked closely with leading device stakeholders including manufacturers, healthcare delivery systems, government agencies, technology companies, and others to improve the security and safety of medical devices throughout their lifecycle. He has presented for ACCE and CE-IT Community on the emerging topic of device cybersecurity and privacy.

 
Dr. Nordenberg served on the Brookings Institution Planning Board for the design of the next generation medical device post-market surveillance system (2014-2015), an FDA sponsored initiative.   In 2007 and 2009 he served as a member of the FDA Science Advisory Board Subcommittee for the evaluation of science and technology at the FDA.  From 2002 through 2007, Dr. Nordenberg held various positions at Centers for Disease Control (CDC), including CIO and Associate Director, National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID).  He was detailed to the ONC for Health Information Technology at HHS in 2004-2005 to catalyze the development of a national strategy for children's health information technology.
 
Prior to CDC, Dr. Nordenberg was on the faculty at the Emory Schools of Medicine and Public Health, and founding Director for the Children's Center Office of Medical Informatics. He also served as physician lead at Egleston Children's Hospital.  He received a BS in Microbiology from the University of Michigan, his MD from Northwestern University, pediatrics training at McGill University and Montreal Children's Hospital, and his fellowship in epidemiology and public health in the Epidemic Intelligence Services Program at CDC with a focus on "big data".

ACCE 2015 Lifetime Achievement Awards

​This award is the highest award given by ACCE. It will be given to an individual based on life-long accomplishments and contributions to the clinical engineering (CE) profession.

​The two 2015 Lifetime Award winners are Binseng Wang, ScD, CCE, FACCE, FAIMBE and Stephen Grimes, FACCE, FHIMSS, FAIMBE


Binseng Wang, ScD, CCE, FACCE, FAIMBE

Binseng Wang, ScD, CCE, FACCE, FAIMBE

One Lifetime Achievement Award winner is Binseng Wang, ScD, CCE, FACCE, FAIMBE. Dr. Wang has been a highly respected national and global CE leader for over 30 years. He earned his BSc EE and MSEE in Brazil, and his ScD from MIT, and is a Certified Clinical Engineer and Certified Quality Management System Auditor.

 
He started his career in Brazil, at the State University of Campinas, where he was a faculty member, the founder and first director of Center for Biomedical Engineering, later a WHO Collaborating Center. He served as Special Advisor on Equipment to the Secretary of Health, Sao Paulo State, where he developed arguably the most comprehensive health technology policy of its time. Moving to the USA, he was a visiting scientist at NIH for 2 years, before joining MEDIQ/PRN Life Support Services where he became VP, Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs. In 2004, he joined Aramark Healthcare Technologies, supporting more than 1500 CE/HTM professionals, and eventually promoted to VP, Quality and Regulatory Compliance.  In 2014, he became VP of Quality and Regulatory Affairs at Sundance Enterprises and Adjunct Professor at the Milwaukee School of Engineering.
 
Binseng has won numerous awards for his professional work and writings, is a Fellow of ACCE and AIMBE, a senior member of IEEE and ASQ, and winner of the prestigious 2010 AAMI CE/BME Achievement Award, as well as the ACCE Managerial Excellence Award twice.  He has been a consultant for WHO-PAHO, World Bank, and Inter-American Development Bank.  In addition to numerous articles and book chapters, he published two books, Strategic Health Technology Incorporation and Medical Equipment Maintenance: Management and Oversight.  His series of articles and presentations on Evidence-Based Maintenance is a landmark in Clinical Engineering.
 
Binseng says about himself: "I was born in China, raised in Brazil, and now live in the USA.  So I am a very confused person." Those who are familiar with him know exactly the opposite; he is the one person who has brought clarity to everything he has touched over a long and very significant career.

​This award is the highest award given by ACCE. It will be given to an individual based on life-long accomplishments and contributions to the clinical engineering (CE) profession.


Stephen Grimes, FACCE, FHIMSS, FAIMBE

Stephen Grimes, FACCE, FHIMSS, FAIMBE

​The other Lifetime Achievement Award winner is Steve Grimes, currently Chief Technology Officer at ABM Healthcare Support Services in Boston.  He has been a visionary leader, contributing to the CE community in many ways and partnering with diverse stakeholders to ensure that healthcare technology is applied safely and effectively.

Steve has more than 30 years of experience with hospitals, shared service organizations, and healthcare consulting firms. He is a nationally recognized authority on topics ranging from future challenges facing clinical engineering and healthcare technology integration to medical device security and risk management. 
 
He is a frequent author and speaker at both national and international venues.  His international work has included projects in China, India, Kosovo, Argentina, Cuba, Brazil, Ecuador, and Mexico. 
 
In 2002 he was named a Fellow of ACCE. He has served as an ACCE officer and board member for eight years including President from 2006 through 2008.  Since 2006 he has served as a board member on ACCE's Healthcare Technology Certification Commission (HTCC), and AAMI's U.S. Certification Commission (USCC) and their International Certification Commission (ICC).
 
Steve is a member of the AAMI Medical Equipment Management Committee.  He has also been a member of AAMI's Clinical Engineering Productivity and Cost Effectiveness Committee since 2004.
 
In 2007 Steve was made a Fellow of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).  He has chaired HIMSS Medical Device Security Workgroup and he currently chairs HIMSS' Patient Safety Task Force. In 2008 he was also named a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).  In February 2011, Steve received the joint industry ACCE / HIMSS Excellence in Clinical Engineering & Information Technology Synergies Award.   In 2003 he received ACCE's Advocacy Award and in 2005 he received ACCE's Professional Achievement Award. 
 
Steve is a graduate of Purdue University's Biomedical Engineering Program.

ACCE 2015 Professional Achievement in Technology Award/Professional Development Award

​The award will be given to an individual for his/her contributions to the CE profession of a professional or technical nature, such as research or development of a new technique or product, a paper of significance on a technical issue, or "trailblazing" work in a new application of CE.


Jennifer Jackson, MBA, CCE

Jennifer Jackson, MBA, CCE

The winner is Jennifer Jackson, MBA, CCE, Director, Clinical Engineering (CE) and Device Integration, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, for her leadership and advocacy for advancing medical device interoperability solutions. 
 
At Cedars-Sinai since 2011, she designed and built one of the first CE departments in the nation to support both the traditional CE service lines as well as the medical device to/from EHR integration development and support.  In just under three years, this advanced team has implemented a robust medical device interoperability platform that includes physiological monitoring, anesthesia systems, IV pumps and several more.  She has shared these experiences consistently through presentations and publications in recent years for several organizations across the globe, including ACCE, HIMSS, AAMI, and the CE-IT Community.  Some recent examples include: Bidirectional EHR Integration with Smart Infusion Pumps at Cedars-Sinai in January 2015 for the Scottsdale Institute, Device Integration and the EHR, presented as an ACCE Teleconference Series Webinar in December 2012, and American Clinical Engineering Experience:  Healthcare Reform and Medical Device Connectivity (invited talk) presented at the X National Convention of the Associazione Italiana Ingegneri Clinici (AIIC) in 2010.
 
Jennifer is a Past President of ACCE (2008-2011), and chaired the HIMSS Task Force on Medical Devices and Patient Safety (2008-2011).  She holds BS in BME from Boston University, and an MBA from Babson College (Wellesley MA).​

ACCE 2015 Professional Achievement in Management Award/Managerial Excellence Award

​The award will be given to an individual for his/her contributions to the CE profession of a managerial nature, such as a paper of significance, solving of a problem or issue for the profession, or the application of new techniques to CE with measurable positive results.


Carol Davis-Smith, MS, CCE

Carol Davis-Smith, MS, CCE

The winner is Carol Davis-Smith, MS, CCE, Vice President, Clinical Technology, Kaiser Permanente, for providing clinical engineering leadership for a major health care delivery system, in several professional roles, and for sharing her experiences regularly on the national stage.  She is a member of the AAMI Board of Directors, is a past chair of the AAMI Technology Management Council, and has served on the US Board of Examiners for Clinical Engineering Certification. She notes: "Management is the work, and leadership is how we do it."
 
At Kaiser Permanente since 2012, Carol has led national collaboration efforts with IT, facilities, and product governance around technology and process management for care delivery.  She has assembled a strong, young Clinical Engineering (CE) and Medical Equipment Consultant (MEC) national team, as well as robust regional leadership for CE/MEC in seven Kaiser Permanente regions, overseeing the work in 38 hospitals and over 600 medical offices spread out over eight states and Washington, District of Columbia.   Previously, at Premier, Inc., she was Director, Performance Partners - providing lifecycle management and clinical engineering consulting services, a senior consultant for capital solutions, and manager of technology assessment. She began her career as a staff clinical engineer at Barnes Hospital BJC Health System.
 
Carol has completed the Kaiser Permanente's Executive Leadership course at Harvard Business School, MS CE from University of Arizona, and BS Bioengineering Technology from University of Dayton.​

ACCE 2015 Student Paper Competition

​The award will be given to an individual currently a student in a CE or related graduate program that wrote a paper that contributes significantly to the body of knowledge in CE


Michele Manzoli

Michele Manzoli

​Winner: Michele Manzoli, CE intern at Yale-New Haven Hospital, MS CE candidate, University of Connecticut

YNHH medical equipment database: Standardization of nomenclature and risk assessment procedure
This paper discusses the use of a standard nomenclature system for medical equipment class descriptions and codes and develops a proposal for a new risk assessment procedure compliant with the new TJC standards for medical equipment maintenance and inspired by the reading of the most recent relevant literature.
 
All papers are available for viewing from the ACCE website.


Darcy Del Dotto

Darcy Del Dotto

Runner-up: Darcy Del Dotto, CE intern at Lifespan, MS CE candidate, University of Connecticut

Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE):
What it is, where we are, and why it is important
 
All papers are available for viewing from the ACCE website.

ACCE 2015 Antonio Hernandez International Clinical Engineering Award

​The award recognizes a CE professional from a country where CE is emerging who has made extraordinary contributions to the advancement of CE in his/her own country or, a professional from another country for their similar efforts in supporting this advance


Caridad Borrás, DSc, FACR, FAAPM, FIOMP

Caridad Borrás, DSc, FACR, FAAPM, FIOMP

​The winner is Caridad Borrás, DSc, FACR, FAAPM, FIOMP, for her commitment to the global collaboration of medical physics and CE to enhance healthcare, and her leadership of IUPESM HTTG (Health Technology Task Group), www.iupesm.org/health-technology-tas-group-httg.

The IUPESM has set up the HTTG to assist countries in defining their health technology (HT) needs, and identifying and rectifying health system constraints for adequate management and utilization of HT, particularly through training, capacity building and the development and application of appropriate technology.  The 2012-2015 HTTG Work Plan: identify/facilitate the implementation of appropriate HT in resource-limited settings by fostering joint scientific and educational activities of medical physicists, medical and biological engineers, and CEs.
 
Cari - who splits time between homes in Washington, DC, and Barcelona, Spain - has had a storied career over 50 years, some highlights:  since 2004 - Consultant on Medical Physics, Radiation Safety and Health Services, and Adjunct Assistant Professor (Radiology), George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC; and from 1988-2003, serving in a variety of significant WHO-PAHO leadership roles.
 
Her multiple professional certifications are in Medical Health Physics and Radiological Physics. Her Doctorate of Science degree is from the University of Barcelona via a project at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA, under a Fulbright Exchange Program.

ACCE / HTF 2015 International ACEW Award

​An Award given to the organization demonstrating significant improvements in national HTM structure and outcomes since ACCE and its partners conducted Advanced Clinical Engineering Workshops (ACEWs) in its country.


Universidad Simon Bolivar

Universidad Simon Bolivar

​The winner is Universidad Simon Bolivar (USB) de Barranquilla, Colombia. The award was given as a result of the university's leadership at the highly creative ACEW in August 2013 titled “Healthcare Technology (HT) Management and Innovation Workshop” that included components of HT, as well as healthcare economics, finance, and healthcare project development. 

This ACEW, resulting from a continued joint effort of USB and Chamber of Commerce of Barranquilla, was then followed by the development of IHE Colombia in May 2014 - led by Dr. Vladimir Quintero, serving as a gateway for Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) CE-IT standards not only across Colombia, but all of Latin America as well.  Vladimir is now Director, IHE-Colombia.  The outcome and evolution of this ACEW was presented at the World Health Organization's Second Global Forum on Medical Devices in November 2013, see www.who.int/medical_devices/global_forum/B06.pdf.
 
Dr. Quintero has over 20 years' experience in the field of HT Management as an international consultant, his focus of activity gradually converged into formulation, implementation, and evaluation of IT projects.  He is an Information Systems developer and consultant, and has worked with USB since 2009.

ACCE HTM Champion 2015 Award

​This Award is given to a health delivery system leader - typically a physician - who has championed CE and Health Technology Management-HTM in a manner that has significantly enhanced the status of the profession either in the U.S. and/or around the world


Joel Nobel, MD

Joel Nobel, MD

​The HTM Champion Award winner is Joel Nobel, MD.  Joel Nobel was the founder ECRI Institute, a USA based nonprofit nongovernmental organization engaged in health services research. He developed ECRI Institute's overall policies and programs, such as its HTA, product evaluation, risk management, and technical assistance services for the health community.  He created the concepts and operating plans for Health Devices, Health Devices Alerts, the Health Devices Sourcebook, the Healthcare Product Comparison System, and many other publications. He also developed ECRI Institute's international programs and its related World Health Organization activities.

ECRI Institute was conceived in 1965 when, as a resident in surgery, Dr. Nobel developed an ongoing research program in resuscitation and emergency care.  ECRI Institute's development was intensified when he completed military service in 1968 and became ECRI Institute's full time scientific director. In 1978, he became president, serving until 2005.
 
Many clinical engineers over the past 50 years and the wider CE/HTM profession owe much to who he was and the work he encouraged.  This award focuses on how he has changed the profession of Clinical Engineering. A friend and colleague notes:
 
A large group of newly minted ‘clinical engineers' met Dr. Joel Nobel at ECRI as new recruits when we were fresh out of college in 1975, when he was about 40 years old. He was clearly a "Man on a Mission" to save patients from pain and injury from defective medical devices, and to improve the efficiency, efficacy, and safety of healthcare.  In retrospect, we now know that Joel was decades ahead of his time, but we also learned that neither past history nor the status quo could deter him one little bit! The good Doctor handed each of ECRI's new clinical engineering recruits in the 1970's a loose-leaf binder chock full of rigorous Employee Handbook rules and a bright red Swiss Army knife, and then threw each of us into our first "mission." We were assigned specific medical technology investigations, often outside our college education, with a mandate to learn the scientific, engineering, and medical principles, find the flaws in each product, identify constructive remedies where possible, write up our reports, submit to daunting internal scientific and peer review, publish our results, and then present our findings in public conferences.
 
TALL order for 21-year olds on their first jobs, but Joel Nobel's faith in this crew of young clinical engineers, and his firm direction and discipline, allowed an awful lot of them to succeed beyond their wildest dreams! We should really laugh at ourselves for the trust Joel placed in each of them at such young ages. In only a few years, many found themselves presenting keynote speeches on his behalf at national and international scientific and medical sessions. Initially, most had little more than a Bachelor's Degree and Dr. Nobel's ‘say-so' to back them up, too! He would sagely counsel: "Just stick to what you know, and don't let anyone draw you onto their turf. You know more about that product than anyone else in the nation, so stick to your guns."
 
"Few would deny that Dr. Nobel's intellectual capacity was tough to keep up with. He seemed to sleep but a couple of hours a night, and regardless of your medical, engineering, scientific, or legal specialty his habit of endless reading and his sharp, critical mind ensured that everyone needed to bring his or her "A-game" when you talked to him. Holidays and vacations seemed of little interest to him unless tied to a working mission or project, and the concept of retirement seemed unfathomable. Dr. Nobel never, ever sat still, and tracking him down around the globe was a challenge until the end! Not sure most of us would trade our own lives for his, but it seemed those choices afforded him the constant cultural and scientific renewal and impact that made him tick.
 
You will certainly read of Dr. Nobel's accomplishments in the future, but most of the accounts will be humble re-telling of a legacy that did - and will continue to – motivate and empower clinical engineers to improve healthcare around the planet in remarkable and important ways. In the early days, half or more of the medical devices his engineers tested were at best mediocre, and many were a threat to life and/or limb. Fortunately, thanks to the way Dr. Nobel crafted ECRI's hard-hitting and trustworthy testing and published reviews, today such testing reveals good-to-excellent products in the US market that are more commonly differentiated on features, ownership cost, and preference, not safety.

Elliot Sloane, a former ACCE president, stated: "To me, early in my career Joel was like a second father, and leaving him and ECRI to expand my own clinical engineering career was not an easy decision to make in 1990. The friendship, leadership, and encouragement he always offered to me and so many other clinical engineers, scientists, attorneys, clinicians, and administrators through the decades were constant to the very end."
 
Honor is due: on ACCE's 25th Anniversary it is worth noting that most of our founding members in 1990 already had great appreciation for Dr. Nobel's leadership in the clinical engineering field." Sloane suggests we remember him with honor and respect, like a "good Samurai, soaring joyously into the winds and in our memories for eternity."
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